viernes, 14 de septiembre de 2012

Scientist? Entrepeneur? I choose both


El MIT me parece un ejemplo a seguir en muchas cosas, pero en el tema del emprendimiento todavía más. Le he cambiado un poco el título al artículo, pero creo que se entiende igual...

“At MIT, we reject the idea that you can’t be both a student and an entrepreneur” stated Bill Aulet, Managing Director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, as he opened up the first Founders’ Skills Accelerator (FSA) Demo Day this past Saturday. Bill emphasized the importance of utilizing MIT’s resources to start your own business—to counter the challenge posed by Peter Thiel, one of the early investors in Facebook, who offered to pay college students to drop out of school to start their own business in 2011. As a recent graduate of MIT, I can personally attest to the critical role that staying in school has played in introducing me to the co-founders of my startup, developing and ultimately incubating our idea, and eventually launching it to obtain seed funding.




Prior to MIT, the idea of starting my own company had never seemed like a realistic goal. You see, I am a biomedical engineer by training and I had spent the previous three years pipetting in a lab. I had no formal business experience prior to school, but always had this inkling to pursue an entrepreneurial venture. After joining MIT’s System Design & Management program, the first thing I did was march myself to the organizer’s meeting of the MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition.



Through the $100K, I was able to take a front row seat to see how other student-run companies succeeded (and failed), by soaking in every elevator pitch, VC judging session, and funding workshop. Through the $100K, I was able to meet students from the Sloan School of Management, who introduced me to Hacking Medicine, an initiative based out of the Trust Center that aimed to build an ecosystem for student engineers, physicians, and entrepreneurs to launch disruptive businesses in healthcare. Still nervous to start my own business, I continued to get involved as a volunteer. I was literally thrown into it when MIT Entrepreneur-in-Residence (EIR) Zen Chu pulled me from my computer in the corner of the room at one of Hacking Medicine’s weekend hack-a-thons and introduced me to my eventual co-founders...

Continúa en el artículo original...